Reformed Articles

The Reality of Fear

https://www.theaquilareport.com/the-reality-of-fear/

Our fears remind us that we are small and that we need Jesus. Dependence on Him is life; independence is a deadly myth. Fear is also a critical alarm that warns us of danger. Without it, we are handicapped in our growth in wisdom because wisdom must discern what is good and safe from what is evil and deadly. Yet, while acknowledging these benefits, we can all agree on this: we would like our fears to be fewer and less intense.

 

Among our ever-expanding troubles, fear and anxiety have pride of place. They are quintessential human issues. They are not so much problems that occasionally seize us; they are regular features of daily life that can be either quiet in the background or loud and dominating in the foreground. In this era, they come attached to our humanity. They say that we are powerless and weak, there are troubles ahead, things cherished are at risk, and there is not much we can do about it. And they are correct. Their specific predictions are often off, and they don’t tell the whole story, but they are correct. In this world, we and the people we love will know trouble (John 16:33).

We might wish all our fears away, but our fears, of course, are not all bad. Their greatest good is that they remind us that we are small and that we need Jesus. Dependence on Him is life; independence is a deadly myth. Fear is also a critical alarm that warns us of danger. Without it, we are handicapped in our growth in wisdom because wisdom must discern what is good and safe from what is evil and deadly. Yet, while acknowledging these benefits, we can all agree on this: we would like our fears to be fewer and less intense.

Look around and see that your fears are everywhere. They live under words such as stressworryjitteryon edgepressure, and dread. They are tied to guilt and so many other everyday struggles. If you feel guilty, you fear judgment. If you feel shame, you fear being seen and exposed before others. Anger is often fear that has some fight left in it. It sees that something you love is at risk, though it is inclined to take a stand rather than freeze or run. Depression can be fear that has given up. Today, it says, is dark and unbearable. The future is worse. It is dark, unbearable, and hopeless. Or consider post-traumatic stress disorder. It describes those of us who have had a brush with destruction, either in the form of physical danger or the evil actions of other people. The fear is that these memories will intrude, or the past will repeat itself in the future. Something bad has happened and something bad will happen. And then there are all our addictions. Addictions are desires that refuse boundaries, but if we look more closely, we’ll see that many of them also hope to distract or anesthetize us from a mind that is reeling, a body that can’t stay still, and a future that is bleak. Addictions are powerful but ultimately ineffective ways to keep fears and anxieties at bay.

Read More

The post The Reality of Fear appeared first on The Aquila Report.

About the author

Reformologist

Add Comment

Click here to post a comment