Reformed Articles

You Are My God (Lloyd-Jones)

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 The first words of David’s prayer in Psalm 63 are, “[O] God, my God you are” (אֱלֹהִ֤ים אֵלִ֥י אַתָּ֗ה).  Or, in better English: “O God, you are my God!”  I like how Martyn Lloyd-Jones reflected on these words:

Listen to David in this psalm; here is the language always of the true children of God. He begins with an expressive exclamation: “O God.” No one ever uses that unless he or she is a child of God. I know that the world in its blasphemy utters these two words as an expletive, but it does not know what it is saying. But here the psalmist offers it from the very depth of his being: “O God.” You sense the feeling—the whole man is involved in it. He turns to the one whom he knows is going to listen. He flees to Him.

And further, he is able to say, “Thou art my God.” Not merely God as such but “my God” in particular. In other words, there is a consciousness of this personal relationship. He does not go doubtfully and uncertainly; he knows that God is his God and that he is God’s child. He turns to God as a child turns to his father and with the same instinctive movement. There is no query, no doubt, no uncertainty. He knows the way is open; he has traveled so often upon it that he can at times utter nothing but “O God.”

David Martyn Lloyd-Jones and Christopher Catherwood, Seeking the Face of God: Nine Reflections on the Psalms (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Books, 2005), 104.

Shane Lems
Covenant Presbyterian Church (OPC)
Hammond, WI, 54015